Geology Courses

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GEOL&101|Intro to Physical Geology w/ Lab [M/S]

5 Credits

Formerly GEL 101

Composition and structure of the earth. Study and identification of common minerals and the three major rock groups. Plate tectonics concept of the evolution of surface features of continents. A study of volcanic, seismic, weathering, and groundwater processes. Outline of geologic development of the Pacific Northwest, including field studies. Lecture and lab must be taken concurrently.

Prerequisite

Prerequisite: grade of 2.0 or better in MATH 040 or 084.

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GEOL&103|Historical Geology w/ Lab [M/S]

5 Credits

Formerly GEL 203

Assessment of the history and development of the earth's physical environment and its inhabitants. An historical and chronologic analysis of the origin of the earth, including the development of the earth through time and discussion based on the paleontologic, sedimentologic, and stratigraphic record. Study of distinctive fossil groups for each geologic period and applications for correlation and reconstruction of regional geologic history. Lecture and lab must be taken concurrently.

Prerequisite

Prerequisite: GEOL& 101 or instructor permission.

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GEOL&110|Environmental Geology w/ Lab [M/S]

5 Credits

Formerly GEL 211

Relationships of human activities with earth materials and processes. Earthquakes, volcanic activity, mass wasting, subsidence, surface water, mineral resources, waste disposal, water pollution, and a heavy emphasis on groundwater may all be included. Students are expected to make interpretations and draw conclusions from scientific data such as graphs, charts, and maps. Lecture and lab must be taken concurrently. Field trips may be included as a part of the laboratory experience.

Prerequisite

Prerequisite: GEOL& 101 or instructor permission.

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GEOL 115|Geology of the National Parks

5 Credits

The U. S. national parks and wilderness monuments preserve spectacular natural wonders. Their beauty is a direct result of their underlying geology. In this course, we explore the processes and forces by which the park lands were formed and transformed over geologic time, and their current geologic significance. This includes volcanism, plate tectonics, mountain-building, and alpine glaciations.

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GEOL 199|Special Studies

1–15 Credits

A class used to explore new coursework.

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GEOL 299|Special Studies

1–15 Credits

A class used to explore new coursework.

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